9/20/17

What we're looking at now.


"The mountains are calling, and I must go." –John Muir They get us all. Those open spaces. Those places far off the paved road where we come into our own head space. Where we shake off the load we've been carrying and just breathe. Just walk. One foot in front of the other. Straight on into the sunset. If it's been a minute since you've headed that way, we encourage you to get out. Just go.

9/16/17

What we're looking at now.


It Gameday so let's have a sale! Enter code FEELSLIKEFALL until Ole Miss kickoff (10:30 EST tonight) and get 20% off all prints. Go teams!

9/14/17

What we're looking at now.


Some days I just miss Atlanta. Grab one of these in ATL at @thisisbrickandmortar or score one on our site. #printsgoinghome

9/12/17

What we're looking at now.


Back in 1803, when we made the Purchase, Napoleon said, "This accession of territory affirms forever the power of the United States, and I have given England a maritime rival who sooner or later will humble her pride." Fast forward to '95, when 18 year-olds were still able to drink there. (They prolly would've let the fifteen-year-old me.) And they still didn't have counties. And they still spoke different languages. And I ate alligator and I got lost and I got found in the French Quarter. I made it back several times in college, down to the Gulf, and heard stories of the Pelican State by my roommate from Ruston. They're good folks, letting good times roll – rolling with all the punches that the weather and the rest of the country and history throw their way. They are a proud lot. A good lot. With more culture and heart than most of us other Southerners can lay claim to. And she's still humbling England.

9/11/17

What we're looking at now.


There is nothing better. With hope, tomorrow is better than today. With hope, a few minutes from now will be easier than a few minutes ago. The men of South Carolina knew it back in 1776 when they put it on the state's crest. Those were dark days. Lorded over from across the Atlantic. Forced to do things they didn't want to do by folks who didn't give them any say. Battling not only the land and elements, but despair. But they had hope. Hope in a future. Hope in this new land. Hope of things to come. They clung to it. And those South Carolinians haven't let it go yet.